Genetic Counseling Practice: Advanced Concepts and Skills

The text book includes 15 chapters that fall into three topic areas:

  • genetic counseling dynamics
  • client cultural and individual characteristics
  • genetic counselor development


Type Book
CME Available No
Topic
Cost Print Price - $114.95 ; eBook Price - $91.99/per publisher
Note 2010


Date of Resource 2010

Genomic Competencies

Experts from the disciplines listed below have tagged this resource as fulfulling genomic competencies.

Genetic Counselor

  • Genetics Expertise and Analysis
    • 2:   Integrate knowledge of psychosocial aspects of conditions with a genetic component to promote client well-being.
      • 2a:   Demonstrate an understanding of psychosocial, ethical, and legal issues related to genetic counseling encounters.
      • 2b:   Describe common emotional and/or behavioral responses that may commonly occur in the genetic counseling context.
      • 2c:   Recognize the importance of understanding the lived experiences of people with various genetic/genomic conditions.
      • 2d:   Evaluate the potential impact of psychosocial issues on client decision-making and adherence to medical management.
  • Interpersonal, Psychosocial and Counseling Skills
    • 10:   Use a range of genetic counseling skills and models to facilitate informed decision-making and adaptation to genetic risks or conditions.
      • 10a:   Demonstrate knowledge of psychological defenses, family dynamics, family systems theory, coping models, the grief process, and reactions to illness.
      • 10b:   Utilize a range of basic counseling skills, such as open-ended questions, reflection, and normalization.
      • 10c:   Employ a variety of advanced genetic counseling skills, such as anticipatory guidance and in-depth exploration of client responses to risks and options.
      • 10d:   Assess clients' psychosocial needs, and evaluate the need for intervention and referral.
      • 10e:   Apply evidence-based models to guide genetic counseling practice, such as short-term client-centered counseling, grief counseling and crisis counseling.
      • 10f:   Develop an appropriate follow-up plan to address psychosocial concerns that have emerged in the encounter, including referrals for psychological services when indicated.
    • 11:   Promote client-centered, informed, non-coercive and value-based decision-making.
      • 11a:   Recognize one's own values and biases as they relate to genetic counseling.
      • 11b:   Actively facilitate client decision-making that is consistent with the client's values.
      • 11c:   Recognize and respond to client-counselor relationship dynamics, such as transference and countertransference, which may affect the genetic counseling interaction.
      • 11d:   Describe the continuum of non-directiveness to directiveness, and effectively utilize an appropriate degree of guidance for specific genetic counseling encounters.
      • 11e:   Maintain professional boundaries by ensuring directive statements, self-disclosure, and self- involving responses are in the best interest of the client.
    • 13:   Apply genetic counseling skills in a culturally responsive and respectful manner to all clients.
      • 13a:   Describe how aspects of culture including language, ethnicity, life-style, socioeconomic status, disability, sexuality, age and gender affect the genetic counseling encounter.
      • 13b:   Assess and respond to client cultural beliefs relevant to the genetic counseling encounter.
      • 13c:   Utilize multicultural genetic counseling resources to plan and tailor genetic counseling agendas, and assess and counsel clients.
      • 13d:   Maintain professional boundaries by ensuring directive statements, self-disclosure, and self-involving responses are in the best interest of the client.
  • Education
    • 14:   Effectively educate clients about a wide range of genetics and genomics information based on their needs, their characteristics and the circumstances of the encounter.
      • 14a:   Identify factors that affect the learning process such as intellectual ability, emotional state, socioeconomic factors, physical abilities, religious and cultural beliefs, motivation, language and educational background.
      • 14b:   Recognize and apply risk communication principles and theory to maximize client understanding.
  • Professional Development & Practice
    • 20:   Support client and community interests in accessing, or declining, social and health services and clinical research.
      • 20e:   Identify appropriate individual and/or group opportunities for ongoing personal supervision and mentorship.
      • 20f:   Accept responsible for one's physical and emo- tional health as it impacts on professional performance.