ACMG Genetics Academy

From the fundamentals of genetics and genomics to the best practices of clinical care, the ACMG Genetics Academy will offer healthcare professionals and scientists access to a variety of dynamic educational formats in one easy to use site: self-paced interactive learning, webcasts, live streaming courses, online archived courses and more. It offers a personalized learning center where individuals can track their courses, manage their credits and access course blogs. New content will be added to the ACMG Genetics Academy regularly. The hugely popular ACMG Genomics Case Conferences, which began in 2014, are also available in the Genetics Academy. During each Genomic Case Conference a team from a selected institution has presented and led discussions on intriguing, complex or difficult patient cases, with the goal of illustrating the adaptation of exome or genome sequencing technology in clinical care.



Type Course
CME Available Yes
Topic
Cost paid
Note



Genomic Competencies

Experts from the disciplines listed below have tagged this resource as fulfulling genomic competencies.

Physician Assistant

  • Explore the role of genetic factors in disease, including the common inherited conditions.

Pharmacist

  • Basic Genetic Concepts
    • B1:   To demonstrate an understanding of the basic genetic/genomic concepts and nomenclature
    • B2:   To recognize and appreciate the role of behavioral, social, and environmental factors (lifestyle, socioeconomic factors, pollutants, etc.) to modify or influence genetics in the manifestation of disease
    • B3:   To identify drug and disease associated genetic variations that facilitate development of prevention, diagnostic and treatment strategies and appreciate there are differences in testing methodologies and are aware of the need to explore these differences these differences in drug literature evaluation
    • B4:   To use family history (minimum of three generations) in assessing predisposition to disease and selection of drug treatment
  • Ethical, Legal and Social Implications (ELSI)
    • E1:   To understand the potential physical and/or psychosocial benefits, limitations and risk of genomic/pharmacogenomic information for individuals, family members and communities, especially with genomic/pharmacogenomic tests that may relate to predisposition to disease
  • Genetics and Disease
    • G2:   To assess the difference between clinical diagnosis of disease and identification of genetic predisposition to disease (genetic variation is not strictly correlated with disease manifestation)
  • Pharmacogenetics/Pharmacogenomics
    • P1:   To demonstrate an understanding of how genetic variation in a large number of proteins, including drug transporters, drug metabolizing enzymes, direct protein targets of drugs, and other proteins (e.g. signal transduction proteins) influence pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics related to pharmacologic effect and drug response
    • P2:   To understand the influence (or lack thereof) of ethnicity in genetic polymorphisms and associations of polymorphisms with drug response
    • P3:   Recognize the availability of evidence based guidelines that synthesize information relevant to genomic/pharmacogenomic tests and selection of drug therapy (e.g. Clinical Pharmacogenomics Implementation Consortium)

Physician

  • Genomic Testing
    • P-GT2A:   Patient Care
      • 2A1:   Discuss the indications for genomic testing - specifically the benefits, risks, and alternatives
      • 2A2:   Explain the implications of placing genomic test results in the patient’s medical record
      • 2A3:   Discuss the possibility of incidental findings and how they will be handled
      • 2A4:   Discuss risks of having genomic testing done: e.g., psychological implications for the individual as well as the family; the potential for discrimination; and the potential effect on insurance coverage.
      • 2A5:   Explain to the patient issues of costs and financial coverage of genomic testing
      • 2A6:   Order, interpret, and communicate the results of appropriate genomic tests, within the physician’s scope of practice
      • 2A7:   Provide referral to an appropriate specialist for genomic testing of a condition outside the physician’s scope of practice
      • 2A8:   Respond to the results of an abnormal genetic screening test, such as newborn screening, including immediate management and appropriate referral
    • P-GT2B:   Knowledge for Practice
      • 2B1:   Describe the major forms of genomic variability
      • 2B2:   Explain how different genomic changes may result in different phenotypes
      • 2B3:   Recognize that genomic tests require interpretation with respect to the patient’s clinical status (e.g., pathogenic, likely pathogenic, benign)
      • 2B4:   Explain the concepts of analytic validity, clinical validity, clinical utility as they relate to genomic testing
      • 2B5:   Recognize that medically ’non-actionable’ genomic results can be useful to the patient and family (i.e., personal utility)
    • P-GT2H:   Personal and Professional Development
      • 2H1:   Engage in continuing education regarding advances in genomic medicine and changing indications for and interpretation of genomic testing
  • Patient Treatment Based on Genomic Results
    • P-PM3A:   Patient Care
      • 3A1:   Identify medical conditions and drug responses that have a strong genetic component
      • 3A2:   Recognize that variants affecting drug responses found in a patient may also have implications for other family members
      • 3A3:   Discern the potential clinical impact of genetic variation on risk stratification and individualized treatment
    • P-PM3B:   Knowledge for Practice
      • 3B1:   Appreciate the importance of genetic diversity of humans and the abundance of genetic variants in each individual genome
      • 3B2:   Identify single-gene disorders that may be amenable to targeted pharmacological therapy
      • 3B3:   Recognize that genomic test results may guide choice of therapy for multifactorial disorders
      • 3B4:   Recognize that there is variability in the phenotypic expression of genetic variants and in response to therapy
      • 3B5:   Recognize that the effects of some medications are strongly influenced by inherited or somatically acquired genetic variation
    • P-PM3H:   Personal and Professional Development
      • 3H1:   Maintain the medical knowledge and clinical competence in genomics required for the provision of therapy
      • 3H2:   Be familiar with the available databases and resources relevant to genetic variation, including ongoing clinical trials involving patients with genetic disorders, pharmacogenomics, and patient-oriented Internet resources from reliable organizations
  • Somatic Genomics
    • P-SG4A:   Patient Care
      • 4A1:   Identify or facilitate identification of patients who may benefit from genomic testing of tissue
      • 4A2:   Explain the benefits and limitations of somatic genomic testing to the patient, including implications regarding treatment of their condition and clarification of his/her prognosis
      • 4A3:   Ensure that tissue biopsy procedures are coordinated to make certain that appropriate and sufficient material is obtained for testing
      • 4A4:   Integrate genomic testing results into the patient-care plan
    • P-SG4B:   Knowledge for Practice
      • 4B1:   Explain the concept of somatic genetic change
      • 4B2:   Describe the role of genomic changes in the pathophysiology and treatment of cancer
      • 4B3:   Explain how genomic testing can be used to guide choice of therapy and adjust drug dosage in patients with cancer
    • P-SG4H:   Personal and Professional Development
      • 4H1:   Keep up-to-date with progress in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer and other tissue-based disorders
  • Microbial Genomic Information
    • P-MG5A:   Patient Care
      • 5A1:   Use genomic-based tests for infectious disease instead of classical strategies where appropriate (e.g., based on clinical validity and turn-around time)
      • 5A2:   Appreciate the sensitivity and specificity of genomics-based tests for diagnosis of infectious disease based on the clinical presentation, suspected pathogen type and testing method
      • 5A3:   Interpret genomics-based tests for diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment of infectious disease
    • P-MG5B:   Knowledge for Practice
      • 5B1:   Explain the core strategies for genomic testing for microbial disease
      • 5B2:   Describe how DNA or RNA sequence variations in the microbiome may predict response to therapy and clinical outcomes
      • 5B3:   Explain the potential reasons for false-positive and false-negative microbial genomic-based tests
      • 5B4:   Explain the importance of ’normal’ microbiome to health and disease
    • P-MG5H:   Personal and Professional Development
      • 5H1:   Maintain up-to-date knowledge on genomic approaches to care for patients with microbial infection

Genetic Counselor

  • Genetics Expertise and Analysis
    • 1:   Demonstrate and utilize a depth and breadth of understanding and knowledge of genetics and genomics core concepts and principles.
      • 1a:   Demonstrate knowledge of principles of human, medical, and public health genetics and genomics and their related sciences.
      • 1b:   Apply knowledge of genetic principles and understand how they contribute to etiology, clinical features and disease expression, natural history, differential diagnoses, genetic testing and test report interpretation, pathophysiology, recurrence risk, management and prevention, and population screening.
    • 2:   Integrate knowledge of psychosocial aspects of conditions with a genetic component to promote client well-being.
      • 2a:   Demonstrate an understanding of psychosocial, ethical, and legal issues related to genetic counseling encounters.
      • 2b:   Describe common emotional and/or behavioral responses that may commonly occur in the genetic counseling context.
      • 2c:   Recognize the importance of understanding the lived experiences of people with various genetic/genomic conditions.
      • 2d:   Evaluate the potential impact of psychosocial issues on client decision-making and adherence to medical management.
    • 3:   Construct relevant, targeted and comprehensive personal and family histories and pedigrees.
      • 3a:   Demonstrate proficiency in the use of pedigree symbols, standard notation, and nomenclature.
      • 3b:   Utilize interviewing skills to elicit a family history and pursue a relevant path of inquiry.
      • 3c:   Use active listening skills to formulate structured questions for the individual case depending on the reason for taking the family history and/or potential diagnoses.
      • 3d:   Elicit and assess pertinent information relating to medical, developmental, pregnancy and psychosocial histories.
      • 3e:   Extract pertinent information from available medical records.
    • 4:   Identify, assess, facilitate, and integrate genetic testing options in genetic counseling practice.
      • 4a:   Investigate the availability, analytic validity, clinical validity, and clinical utility of screening, diagnostic and predictive genetic/genomic tests.
      • 4b:   Evaluate and assess laboratories and select the most appropriate laboratory and test based on the clinical situation.
      • 4c:   Identify and discuss the potential benefits, risks, limitations and costs of genetic testing.
      • 4d:   Coordinate and facilitate the ordering of appropriate genetic testing for the client.
      • 4e:   Interpret the clinical implications of genetic test reports.
      • 4f:   Recognize and differentiate specific considerations relevant to genetic versus genomic and clinical versus research testing in terms of the informed consent process, results disclosure, institutional review board (IRB) guidelines, and clinical decision-making.
    • 5:   Assess individuals' and their relatives' probability of conditions with a genetic component or carrier status based on their pedigree, test result(s), and other pertinent information.
      • 5a:   Assess probability of conditions with a genetic component or carrier status using relevant knowledge and data based on pedigree analysis, inheritance patterns, genetic epidemiology, quantitative genetics principles, and mathematical calculations.
      • 5b:   Incorporate the results of screening, diagnostic and predictive genetic/genomic tests to provide accurate risk assessment for clients.
      • 5c:   Evaluate familial implications of genetic/genomic test results.
      • 5d:   Identify and integrate relevant information about environmental and lifestyle factors into the risk assessment.
    • 6:   Demonstrate the skills necessary to successfully manage a genetic counseling case.
      • 6a:   Develop and execute a case management plan that includes case preparation and follow-up.
      • 6b:   Assess and modify the case management plan as needed to incorporate changes in management and surveillance recommendations.
      • 6c:   Document and present the genetic counseling encounter information clearly and concisely, orally and in writing, in a manner that is understandable to the audience and in accordance with professional and institutional guidelines and standards.
      • 6d:   Identify and introduce research options when indicated and requested in compliance with applicable privacy, human subjects, regional and institutional standards.
      • 6e:   Identify, access and present information to clients on local, regional, national and international resources, services and support.
    • 7:   Critically assess genetic/genomic, medical and social science literature and information.
      • 7a:   Plan and execute a thorough search and review of the literature.
      • 7b:   Evaluate and critique scientific papers and identify appropriate conclusions by applying knowledge of relevant research methodologies and statistical analyses.
      • 7c:   Synthesize information obtained from a literature review to utilize in genetic counseling encounters.
      • 7d:   Incorporate medical and scientific literature into evidenced-based practice recognizing that there are limitations and gaps in knowledge and data.
  • Professional Development & Practice
    • 17:   Act in accordance with the ethical, legal and philosophical principles and values of the genetic counseling profession and the policies of one's institution or organization.
      • 17a:   Follow the guidance of the National Society of Genetic Counselors Code of Ethics.
      • 17b:   Recognize and respond to ethical and moral dilemmas arising in genetic counseling practice and seek outside consultation when needed.
      • 17c:   Identify and utilize factors that promote client autonomy
      • 17d:   Ascertain and comply with current professional credentialing requirements, at the institutional, state, regional and national level.
      • 17e:   Recognize and acknowledge situations that may result in a real or perceived conflict of interest.
    • 18:   Demonstrate understanding of the research process.
      • 18a:   Articulate the value of research to enhance the practice of genetic counseling.
      • 18b:   Demonstrate an ability to formulate a research question.
      • 18c:   Recognize the various roles a genetic counselor can play on a research team and identify opportunities to participate in and/or lead research studies.
      • 18d:   Identify available research-related resources.
      • 18e:   Apply knowledge of research methodology and study design to critically evaluate research outcomes.
      • 18f:   Apply knowledge of research methodology and study designs to educate clients about research studies relevant to them/their family.
      • 18g:   Describe the importance of human subjects' protection and the role of the Institutional Review Board (IRB) process.
    • 19:   Advocate for individuals, families, communities and the genetic counseling profession.
      • 19a:   Recognize the potential tension between the values of clients, families, communities and the genetic counseling profession.
      • 19b:   Support client and community interests in access- ing, or declining, social and health services and clinical research.
      • 19c:   Identify genetic professional organizations and describe opportunities for participation and leadership.
      • 19d:   Employ strategies that to increase/promote access to genetic counseling services.
    • 20:   Support client and community interests in accessing, or declining, social and health services and clinical research.
      • 20a:   Display initiative for lifelong learning.
      • 20b:   Recognize one's limitations and capabilities in the context of genetic counseling practice.
      • 20c:   Seek feedback and respond appropriately to performance critique.
      • 20d:   Demonstrate a scholarly approach to genetic counseling, including using available evidence-based principles in the preparation and execution of a genetic counseling encounter.
      • 20e:   Identify appropriate individual and/or group opportunities for ongoing personal supervision and mentorship.
      • 20f:   Accept responsible for one's physical and emo- tional health as it impacts on professional performance.
      • 20g:   Recognize and respect professional boundaries between clients, colleagues, and supervisors.
    • 21:   Understand the methods, roles and responsibilities of the process of clinical supervision of trainees.
      • 21a:   Engage in active reflection of one's own clinical supervision experiences.
      • 21b:   Identify resources to acquire skills to appropriately supervise trainees.
      • 21c:   Demonstrate understanding of the dynamics and responsibilities of the supervisor/supervisee relationship.
    • 22:   Accept responsibility for one's physical and emotional health as it impacts on professional performance.
      • 22a:   Distinguish the genetic counseling scope of practice in relation to the roles of other health professionals.
      • 22b:   Develop positive relationships with professionals across different disciplines.
      • 22c:   Demonstrate familiarity with the health care system as it relates to genetic counseling practice including relevant privacy regulations, referral and payment systems.
      • 22d:   Demonstrate effective interaction with other professionals within the healthcare infrastructure to promote appropriate and equitable delivery of genetic services.
      • 22e:   Assist non-genetic healthcare providers in utilizing genetic information to improve patient care in a cost-effective manner.
      • 22f:   Promote responsible use of genetic/genomic technologies and information to enhance the health of individuals, communities, and the public.